Iconoclast: Dallas ’74

Iconoclast: Dallas '74

Course Reading: Week One

Traveler’s Dick

Image credit: Mary Walling Blackburn, (Contaminated) Sermon Chart, 2015. Courtesy of the CCA Wattis Institute, photos by Beryl Bevilacque.

♂ Anti-Fertility Garden

press_mwb_sd3

In response to the punitive reproductive rights legislation recently meted out by the Texas state government, a male anti-fertility garden was planted in the yard of Sala Diaz, an exhibition space in San Antonio, Texas.

The garden contains elements of plants alleged to cause temporary to permanent sterility in men, including neem, papaya, cotton and myrtle. Some of these plant materials are found in a body-sized soap painting made by Sophy Naess; this soap is displayed in the garden next to a homemade one-man hot tub, which has also proven to be an effective measure in reducing the quality of human sperm.

ESVMID

esvmid documentation

ESVMID, 2015. Inkjet prints, digital C-prints, Kartell Crystal Ghost Stool, walrus penis bone, chair mat, ink, website.

ESVMID is a networked art project in two parts. The first part is an online speculative archive that catalogues visualizations of Edna St. Vincent Millay’s lost ivory dildo. The speculative archive will contain over 30 visualizations of ESVM’s ivory dildo images that reference the sexual organs of old lovers, hyena clitori, the mother as phallus.

The second part, which remains unrealized, consists of a client application which allows consumers/collectors/visitors to purchase an interpretive replication of ESVM’s lost ivory dildo carved from what is considered ‘legal ivory’. Mammoth tusks, hippo teeth, antique documented pre-ban elephant tusks, as well as Sperm whale teeth.

If a willing collaborator can be found, the process will function as follows: legally certified carvers, based in Canada, will receive an on-line order from a visitor; after the payment is processed, the carver will produce her version of ESVM’s lost dildo. Despite the use of ‘legal ivory’ the carving may be confiscated by customs. The laws and the application of the laws are unstable. The unstable objects, purchased but unclaimed, will stay in Canada, until the purchaser and the carver determine together how the object shall travel: will they risk shipping the ivory dildo through international boundaries? Will the client travel to Canada and smuggle it within her/his own body?

esvmid2

Hecate’s Necklace (Speculative Numismatics)

WallingBlackburn_Mary_001

Hecate’s Necklace [Numismatics], 2014. Coins, enamel, digital animation.

Hecate, goddess of the City Poor and the Mother of Ghosts, wears a necklace of severed testicles. What values shift if we replace the bust of one depressed American president with one small pair of balls painted in enamel? Speculative numismatics imagines and circulates the vision of an alternate society by disfiguring existing currency. It’s nuts.

Hecate’s Necklace, consisting of 31 coins scattered across the globe, operates within David Horvitz’s multi-prongedCigarette Beetle. Cigarette Beetle amalgamates a number of artists’ works and seeds them through the world’s libraries, including The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (Kansas City), MOMA, PNCA library and 28 others Horvitz has not disclosed to date.

Another iteration of the project saw the necklace realized as an animation:

#1 First exercises

class #1

  • Blindly replicate cave drawings on scroll while watching Herzog’s treatment of the prehistoric hand. (30 minutes)
  • Select another’s blind cave replica and attempt to reproduce it. Analyze what falls apart. (5 minutes)
  • Introduction exercise. Each will draw their very first memory. (15 minutes)
  • Homework: Make a sketchbook out of strictly found materials.

class #2

  • With eyes closed, draw your memory of a garden (5 minutes)
  • Together, on one large sheet of paper, draw your memory of a garden.These gardens will fuse. (30 minutes)
  • Next, on a clean sheet of paper, you will use another’s hand to draw the garden. The person is the pencil. Move them accordingly (30minutes). Assess the differences between the three iterations.
  • Homework: Scavenge or produce your own charcoal.

class #3

  • Together, go out to garden with fountain; make observational drawings of the garden using paintbrushes dipped in water from the fountain upon concrete sidewalk.
  • Peruse a range of artist’s sketchbooks at the library and online (Oscar’s Sketchbook (19th century Australian) and the sketchbooks of Lee Lozano, Louise Bourgeois, Joseph Beuys, Robert Motherwell,  Joseph E.Yoakum (online))…
  • Select a sketch from one these sketchbooks; re-draw as a blind contour drawing
  • Swap drawings with another person; re-draw their drawing on the same page. Together, analyze the differences between the drawings.
  • Homework for class #4: Two drawings: Without consulting outside sources, draw the piranha (as notion; as idea). Next draw the piranha from the photograph. Email both images before the aquarium. The process of mapping the difference between notion, reproduction, and empirical observation is paramount.
  • Homework for class #6: Choose a sketch from an artist’s sketchbook (books on reserve in the library); produce a set of instructions that you will deliver to fellow students to reproduce the drawing you have chosen without ever having seen it.

class #4

  • Meeting at the small, aging children’s aquarium.
  • Locate the piranha tank. Make a series of drawings that focuses on the volume of the fish versus the detail:  10 ten-second drawings (blind contour);  10 ten-second drawings  (contour); 5 one-minute drawings (do not lift the pencil from the page); 5 two-minute drawings where you alternate thick lines and thin lines. Then, select two tanks adjacent to one another. One tank is empty and one is full. Draw for ten minutes. Head to stingray tank; make a thirty minute drawing. Realize that your subjects will be in flux.
  • Homework: Prepare materials to make your ownpaper on Wednesday (bring heaps of newspapers, paper from recycling bins) dried leaves, scissors, a medium bowl, a grease splatter screen, a cookie tray, a hairdryer  and blender (optional),parchment paper. You can collaborate in regards to bringing materials. In total, the class should have two of each of these items. Be sure to clean up the work space when you leave.  Be sure to have three pieces of homemade paper for use in class on Monday, along with scavenged charcoal.

Unreal Lines, Real Feelings

Introduction to Drawing: Unreal Lines, Real Feelings

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Subjects of Research: Artist as Subject, Artist as Model, Cave Drawings, Copying and Replicating (Human Xerox Machine), Drawing Machines, Drawing as Sensation, History of Drawing, Non-Perspective Drawing, Real-ish Things (The Still Life).

 

Even as we engage traditional structures of approaching the mark (artist model, still-life, replication), our sense of what comprises drawing should buckle, collapse, and reconstitute itself. Please abolish all of your preconceptions of how we draw and what we draw. Together, we will do this by expanding our notion of what makes a line (i.e.: graphite, blood, boat, router, string…) and what takes the line (i.e. paper, street, water, humans). We will trace the sources of our material (graphite foraged in Northern Mexico or shipped from Sri Lanka, hand-made charcoal or conflict charcoal produced in Central Africa; recycled paper or finely milled, birch bark, or standard 9 x 11 printing paper).

 

A contemporary overview of expanded drawing practice will include works such as Richard Long’s “A Line Made by Walking”(1967), Mierles Ukeles Laderman’s collaboration with tug boat captains (1984), and Marie Lorenz’s Tide and Current Taxi (2005-); Mark Lombardi’s diagrams of how power is brokered (2000) ,Robin Rhode’s chalk drawings (1998-) that moonlight as performances; Santiago Sierra’s tattooing a continuous line on  the bodies of drug addicts (1998-) and Fred Sandback’s preoccupation with the line as both drawing and sculpture (1967-2003). Sandback perceived his work as a drawing that is habitable. Together, as a class, we can try to figure out how to live in the line, as suggested by Sandback, but we can also determine the lure of the uninhabitable mark as well.

 

——————————————————–

 

Introduction to Drawing: Unreal Lines, Real Feelings

Fall 2014

Professor: Mary Walling Blackburn

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Subjects of Research: Artist as Subject, Artist as Model, Cave Drawings, Copying and Replicating (Human Xerox Machine), Drawing Machines, Drawing as Sensation, History of Drawing, Non-Perspective Drawing, Real-ish Things (The Still Life).

Even as we engage traditional structures of approaching the mark (artist model, still-life, replication), our sense of what comprises drawing should buckle, collapse, and reconstitute itself. Please abolish all of your preconceptions of how we draw and what we draw. Together, we will do this by expanding our notion of what makes a line (i.e.: graphite, blood, boat, router, string…) and what takes the line (i.e. paper, street, water, humans). We will trace the sources of our material (graphite foraged in Northern Mexico or shipped from Sri Lanka, hand-made charcoal or conflict charcoal produced in Central Africa; recycled paper or finely milled, birch bark, or standard 9 x 11 printing paper).

A contemporary overview of expanded drawing practice will include works such as Richard Long’s “A Line Made by Walking”(1967), Mierles Ukeles Laderman’s collaboration with tug boat captains (1984), and Marie Lorenz’s Tide and Current Taxi (2005-); Mark Lombardi’s diagrams of how power is brokered (2000) ,Robin Rhode’s chalk drawings (1998-) that moonlight as performances; Santiago Sierra’s tattooing a continuous line on  the bodies of drug addicts (1998-) and Fred Sandback’s preoccupation with the line as both drawing and sculpture (1967-2003). Sandback perceived his work as a drawing that is habitable. Together, as a class, we can try to figure out how to live in the line, as suggested by Sandback, but we can also determine the lure of the uninhabitable mark as well.

——————————————————–

COURSE MATERIALS * INTRODUCTION * CLASS STRUCTURE

Each class will begin with a collective drawing exercise, followed by a lecture featuring various approaches to drawing and artists’ works that feature or incorporate mark making. A longer drawing exercise will extend to the end of class excepting days when critiques are held.

Understand that we will engage in life drawing which features nude models, as well as creating still-lives and sometimes we will travel off-campus to museums to copy and cultural sites to draw plein air.

Sketchbook

You will construct your own sketchbook of 100 pages out of found materials (recycled paper, binding tape). You will make one drawing each day this Fall. You will decide whether these drawings will be autobiographical, describe daily instances, reproduce existing paintings and sculptures, or focus on a certain set of objects. In class, we will examine the journal sketches of Italian mannerist Pontormo (1494-1557), along with the marginalia of other cultural producer’s notebooks ranging from Commander Mervyn Scott Lindslay ‘s sketchbook whilst a prisoner of the Japanese at North Point Camp in Hong Kong from 1942 to 1945 to the notebooks of artists Lee Lozano, Louise Bourgeois, John Sargent and Edvard Munch; from presidential doodles to Sultan Mehmet II’s journal, and finally a set of 40 autobiographical pencil drawings known as Oscar’s sketchbook (authored by a 19th century Australian Aborigine identified only by his name and purported hometown (Cookstown, Queensland)).

Supplies

Please note that we will trace the sources of our material (be it graphite foraged in northern Mexico or shipped from Sri Lanka, hand-made charcoal or conflict charcoal produced in Central Africa, recycled paper, birch bark, or standard 9 x 11 printing paper, the life cycle of the ink cartridges (raw material its sourced from, their production and disposal), the origin of chalks and our own production of pigment.

Unless specified beforehand, always bring a collection of at least three different drawing implements of your choosing with you to class (e.g. charcoal, pencil, and pen), as well as at least three sets of papers of different sizes and attributes (e.g. newsprint, graph paper, watercolor paper.) Go to the art supply store, look through the paper stock, and experiment with size, weight, and texture. Additionally, expect to continue to produce your own materials when necessary over the course of the term. In the initial weeks, various recipes for these supplies will be distributed.

IN CLASS WORK

 Beginning

Together, on our first day, we will still our hand, returning to the earliest gestures, observing cave art (BCE 40,800) from Cueva de El Castillo and viewing excerpts from Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams and documentation of drawings in Texas’s White Shaman and Panther Cave. These first marks will saturate our thinking. What is the most economic line? What sensations does a stark drawing engender? And when is it too lean, ungenerous…? What can we learn about light/dark and soft/hard from these works? Moreover, let us consider surface. Why should paper always take the mark? Let’s investigate other sites to mark and to view.

Possible Lecture Materials

Our lecture materials will include a wide-ranging survey of mark making within contemporary art. We will touch upon shaker spirit drawings, Lakota ledger book drawings, medicinal tattooing, and Hilma Af Klint’s mystic works. We will examine the sketchbooks of artists, such as William Blake, Lee Lozano, Ree Morton, Edvard Munch, Jon Sargent, and ‘Oscar’s sketchbook’ in order to ascertain the range of approach to the working notebook. We will look at institutionally supported artists such as Mark Lombardi, Maria Lassnig, David Hammons, Kim Jones, and Otto Dix as well as Bauhaus curricula and European surrealist drawing tactics.

An overview of expanded drawing practice will include but is not limited to works such as Ariella Azoulay’s Different Ways Not to Say Deportation, Regina Jose Galindo’s ¿Quien Peude Borrar Las Huellas? A Walk from the Court Of Constitutionality to the National Palace of Guatemala (2003) Richard Long’s A Line Made by Walking (1967), Teresa Margoles’ Papeles de la Morgue, Frances Alys’ Green Line (2005), Mierles Ukeles Laderman’s collaboration with tugboat captains (1984) and Marie Lorenz’s Tide and Current Taxi (2005-). Finally, we will consider Fred Sandback’s preoccupation with the line as something habitable.

 FINAL PROJECTS

Project proposals shall be turned in at mid term. Proposals will include projects that are both private (campus) and public (within the city) iterations. The final work will be exhibited in either both locations or one (as determined in consultation with Dallas community members, course participants, and SMU administration) in the final two weeks of the course.

GRADING

Assessment is primarily determined by the quantity of sketches and drawings produced over the term— “grading by the pound”. Your sketchbook, containing at minimum100 drawings, must be complete, scanned and uploaded to the free social media site ISSU, by the end of the term. At mid-term you will scan and submit the first half of your sketchbook. These drawings will need to be mindful of critical content, aesthetic inquiry, and vulnerability. Classroom participation includes producing work in-class, engaging in others’ work during critiques, discussing the screened works, and a commitment to the exercises conducted in class.

 CLASS STRUCTURE

 Each class will begin with a collective drawing exercise, followed by a lecture featuring various approaches to drawing and artists’ works that feature or incorporate mark making. A longer drawing exercise will extend to the end of class excepting days when critiques are held.

Understand that we will engage in life drawing which features nude models, as well as creating still-lives and sometimes we will travel off-campus to museums to copy and cultural sites to draw plein air.

Sketchbook

You will construct your own sketchbook of 100 pages out of found materials (recycled paper, binding tape). You will make one drawing each day this Fall. You will decide whether these drawings will be autobiographical, describe daily instances, reproduce existing paintings and sculptures, or focus on a certain set of objects. In class, we will examine the journal sketches of Italian mannerist Pontormo (1494-1557), along with the marginalia of other cultural producer’s notebooks ranging from Commander Mervyn Scott Lindslay ‘s sketchbook whilst a prisoner of the Japanese at North Point Camp in Hong Kong from 1942 to 1945 to the notebooks of artists Lee Lozano, Louise Bourgeois, John Sargent and Edvard Munch; from presidential doodles to Sultan Mehmet II’s journal, and finally a set of 40 autobiographical pencil drawings known as Oscar’s sketchbook (authored by a 19th century Australian Aborigine identified only by his name and purported hometown (Cookstown, Queensland)).

 Supplies

Please note that we will trace the sources of our material (be it graphite foraged in northern Mexico or shipped from Sri Lanka, hand-made charcoal or conflict charcoal produced in Central Africa, recycled paper, birch bark, or standard 9 x 11 printing paper, the life cycle of the ink cartridges (raw material its sourced from, their production and disposal), the origin of chalks and our own production of pigment.

Unless specified beforehand, always bring a collection of at least three different drawing implements of your choosing with you to class (e.g. charcoal, pencil, and pen), as well as at least three sets of papers of different sizes and attributes (e.g. newsprint, graph paper, watercolor paper.) Go to the art supply store, look through the paper stock, and experiment with size, weight, and texture. Additionally, expect to continue to produce your own materials when necessary over the course of the term. In the initial weeks, various recipes for these supplies will be distributed.

 IN CLASS WORK

Beginning

Together, on our first day, we will still our hand, returning to the earliest gestures, observing cave art (BCE 40,800) from Cueva de El Castillo and viewing excerpts from Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams and documentation of drawings in Texas’s White Shaman and Panther Cave. These first marks will saturate our thinking. What is the most economic line? What sensations does a stark drawing engender? And when is it too lean, ungenerous…? What can we learn about light/dark and soft/hard from these works? Moreover, let us consider surface. Why should paper always take the mark? Let’s investigate other sites to mark and to view.

 Possible Lecture Materials

 Our lecture materials will include a wide-ranging survey of mark making within contemporary art. We will touch upon shaker spirit drawings, Lakota ledger book drawings, medicinal tattooing, and Hilma Af Klint’s mystic works. We will examine the sketchbooks of artists, such as William Blake, Lee Lozano, Ree Morton, Edvard Munch, Jon Sargent, and ‘Oscar’s sketchbook’ in order to ascertain the range of approach to the working notebook. We will look at institutionally supported artists such as Mark Lombardi, Maria Lassnig, David Hammons, Kim Jones, and Otto Dix as well as Bauhaus curricula and European surrealist drawing tactics.

An overview of expanded drawing practice will include but is not limited to works such as Ariella Azoulay’s Different Ways Not to Say Deportation, Regina Jose Galindo’s ¿Quien Peude Borrar Las Huellas? A Walk from the Court Of Constitutionality to the National Palace of Guatemala (2003) Richard Long’s A Line Made by Walking (1967), Teresa Margoles’ Papeles de la Morgue, Frances Alys’ Green Line (2005), Mierles Ukeles Laderman’s collaboration with tugboat captains (1984) and Marie Lorenz’s Tide and Current Taxi (2005-). Finally, we will consider Fred Sandback’s preoccupation with the line as something habitable.

 FINAL PROJECTS

Project proposals shall be turned in at mid term. Proposals will include projects that are both private (campus) and public (within the city) iterations. The final work will be exhibited in either both locations or one (as determined in consultation with Dallas community members, course participants, and SMU administration) in the final two weeks of the course.

 GRADING

Assessment is primarily determined by the quantity of sketches and drawings produced over the term— “grading by the pound”. Your sketchbook, containing at minimum100 drawings, must be complete, scanned and uploaded to the free social media site ISSU, by the end of the term. At mid-term you will scan and submit the first half of your sketchbook. These drawings will need to be mindful of critical content, aesthetic inquiry, and vulnerability. Classroom participation includes producing work in-class, engaging in others’ work during critiques, discussing the screened works, and a commitment to the exercises conducted in class.

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 10

CRITIQUE of objects…Construction of Spatial Methodologies

PHYSICAL DIRECTIONS:

1. All arrive at the school at 3 with all drawings, sculptures, paintings (all still objects produced to date this Fall).

2. The room is cleared of all materials because we will read all of the objects by way of the objects that are near to them. They rope one another into meaning.

3. Together we will decide where all of these objects are placed and how.

4. Together we will determine a method based on the space we are in, its histories, and our own. We will write these down.

5. Together we shall read Walls  by Georges Perec.

6. Should we revise our methodologies based on this text?

7. Together, we will listen to author  Bhanu Kapil read aloud about territories, spaces, bodies (http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Kapil.html). Can we extract a spatial methodology of display from what we listen to?

8. Now, now, an hour later we will begin to arrange the works based on a spatial methodology invented by the class.

9. Now we will assess the works and the method. Can one be extracted from the other?

 Homework: CAMPUS AS STUDIO

Find the biggest rock you can safely carry.

Consider its formal properties: surface, scale, weight.

Make the rock pure.

Research its history (geology, cultural assignations).

Document the rock. Prepare to install the rock on campus based on horizon, night sky, solstice, equinox, elements.

Prepare a dossier for the rock.

Bring the rock to class. Bring its carefully prepared dossier. Thanks.

 

 

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 9

CRITIQUE of STUDIO (field recordings of the studio site-tested)

 

___________________________________________________

PHYSICAL DIRECTIONS:

Please bring all of the sound works produced to date to the train station at 3:20 (field recordings and otherwise). Have all of your soundworks loaded onto a portable audio system with headphones (shuffle, walkmen, etceteras). Be sure to have one hour of recorded materials. Test device three times before you arrive. Be sure battery is full.
Hand device to another student and instruct them as to how it works. Test together. When the train arrives, we will all board. We shall all be listening to another’s field recordings.At 4:20 we will exit the train. Ww will take a break. We will write down any extraneous thoughts we have about the sound/trip
At 4:30 we will board a train in the opposite direction. We will write as we ride.
Here are some options:
1. Note every shift in the recording as it progresses. Create a visual score.
2. Note every moment that the landscape and the score merge (include number of minutes and seconds from the station where the score began).
3. Note every moment that you forgot to listen as soon as you realize that you drifted.. Make a record of drifting. Record the exact minutes and seconds from the originating station.
Can these notations be converted into a score to be followed by a dancer or musician?
________________________________________________________________________________________
At 5:20 we shall return to the original station. Take 20 minutes to write a note to the student who produced these field recordings. Attach your notes. Consider these questions when writing your note:
1. When is an experience an object? When does the object begin and end? (Can I sell it?!) Is sound an object and if so, when?
2. When is a field recording enough? Was this enough? Was this too much?
3. Was this a human experience? Was this a technological experience? Was I able to think about studio (the fact of it, the need for it)?
4. How were you listening? With your whole body? Just ears? Is anything else possible? Did you refuse to listen? What is good about refusal?
5. Was this a shared experience? How?
Return all materials to the student who made the recording. S/he will bring these to class.
________________________________________________________________
HOMEWORK: CAMPUS as STUDIO
Take the score produced by your listener.
Find a dancer or a musician to perform the score on campus (in a public area within the campus).
Be sure to email all classmates and the art department- telling them exactly when and where the score is being performed over the next four days.

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 8

CRITIQUE THE STUDIO

PHYSICAL DIRECTIONS:
1. Install all videos (on your laptop)  and photographs (black and white standard printer paper printed flush (no borders)) produced for this course to date. If you do not have a laptop, check out a loaner from the ‘tech shack’ in advance. We shall not use photo paper because these are studies (versus economic objects with archival pretensions).
2. The first person to arrive determines the install, placing their laptop in the center of the room. All other works establish their relation to the first object accordingly.
3. The photographs will operate similarly. The first person will install their photo/photos in the center of a cleared wall. All following works will be installed in relationship to the first. All shall be  flush to one another. Bring an adhesive that attaches to the back.
_________________________________________________________
QUESTIONS
To be answered collectively:
1. Room. What is room? What are the qualities of this room (emotional history, cultural baggage, economic residue)? What are the quantities of this room (scale, light, air)? How do they touch your object and how does your object touch back? Wait, does the object have its own agency?
To be answered with movement (not words):
1. You have made a clearing for your object…a clearing for the gaze. You wish for a body to approach and stop and stay. Another object stumbles/directly squats in the path of yours. The intervention burnishes and you deepen it? How? The aggression destabilizes your work, you act?
______________________________________________________________________
SELF-INTERVIEW, Self-Studio  (in class writing exercise)
1. Do you have a room of one’s own (Hi Virginia)? Do you have a studio that is a room independent of all other functions? What suffers if the studio is not also the bedroom/studio, the kitchen/studio. the bathroom/studio, the garden/studio, the garage/studio? What is gained? What is the vault/hanger/factory sized studio render? Whom is it in service to? Who are you in service to?
2. When is your body the studio? Can you set up shop in the earlobe  as does Joe Sola (http://www.laweekly.com/publicspectacle/2013/10/11/gallerist-displays-paintings-inside-her-own-ear), but is that more than stunt? (Forgive me, perhaps all you crave is stunt; art as spectacle.) Does one make  work on the clean plain of your back (Yang Zhichao’s Planting Grass); is the forehead also a terrifying studio (http://cabinetmagazine.org/issues/28/turner.php)?
DOUBLES (interview between two students, conducted in front of class three times): Ideal means of production
1. Why call art ‘production’? If we evoke the team, why do we make work alone? What happens when we make work together- when the room is full of texts and butts and red bulls (communication that exits the room, stimulants, demands)?
2. What conditions do you need to think deeply? What must happen for you to generate complex positions, emotions…? What sort of space does it take for you to be vulnerable?
3. How will you engineer/forge these spaces within this campus infrastructure?

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 8 and Class 9 and Class 10

CRITIQUE

We shall engage in a three hour critique of all works to date for two days. Below is a brief primer on the pitfalls and glories of the practice within institution.

Glossary: The Art School Critique and its Emotional Territories (Coursing Between Students and Teachers) (Promises, Possibilities and Devastations)

Aggression, overt; sublimated; menstrual; cocksure

Aimlessness, decried; lauded

Ambition, raw and distorted

Ambivalence, towards the object; towards the ephemeral

Anal Stage

Anticipation, of your moment

Anxiety, runs through

Attention, free-floating

Belief: as masked; as mocked; as envied

Betrayal: by the teacher; by peers; of self

Boredom, as atmosphere vs. material

Claustrophobia, as combated by recusing oneself to the restroom

Compliance: to the will of the mob/class; to the will of personal manias

Composure, please

Compulsion, repetition.

Concern; for object, for self; no

Confessions: awkward; unmediated; unintegrated

Construction of obstacles, make it bigger.

Control, magical; defensive

Cure, possible

Desire, for total affirmation (all-loving mother); for repair (art as trade)

Destruction: of line of flight

Ego, as intermediary surface; critique channeled through.

Embarrassment

Experience, fantasy of

False Self

Fathers, as model for the power structure within the classroom

Feelings

Future, is in their critics hands

Genius as bogeyman in the classroom; guilt that one is not genius

Humiliation as bogeyman

Improvisation, as bust or boon

Infant: solitude of; sucking and relation to breast

Jokes, as salve. See also Laughter

Kissing, as a way to imagine the relation between object and viewer

Knowing, unknowing/ not knowing

Love, as foreign to the critique process; the possibility of L. in critique

Mourning, of student as obstruction to receiving critique

Narcissism, of teacher; of student.

Nourishment, without food.

Objects: of fear; sexual; of knowledge; of love and hate; disregard and destruction of; of worry; good; transformational; absence of

Observation, as ideal

Orality, as privelaged

Pain, of non-reaction

Paranoia, of swiped idea

Privacy, undone

Protest, to critique as bad etiquette

Recognition, of some kind of beauty

Repetition, compulsion (rewarded)

Resistance, paramount

Ruthlessness, fetishized

Storytelling, as perceived digression

Suadade, as obstruction to perception of the work

Trust: illusory; performed; pursued; touched upon

Unhappiness, as mirage (in relation to production)

Unpleasure, as mirage (in relation to production)

Use: of instincts; of symptoms; of worries; of objects; of language

Wish (es): to be understood; punishment for; desire and; for obstacles

Yes; a critique based on

Yet; as apology for work to come

– published in “Draw It With Your Eyes Closed: The Art of the Art Assignment:Paper Monument: 2012.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

For those who are following remotely, I encourage a ‘guerilla’ installation of works made to date and the construction of audience and dialogue on your own terms.

.

 

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 7

 

For those who are taking this course in a fixed location with me at helm, we shall meet at 3:45 pm at the DMA. Let us meet at this show: “Saturated” Dye Decorated Cloths from North and West Africa”.

For those who are independently attending to this course from remote locations, here are several other textile museums to integrate into your work if you choose:

If you are in Philly: http://fabricworkshopandmuseum.org/  If you are in DC: http://museum.gwu.edu/  If you are in London: http://ftmlondon.org  If you are in Lima:  http://fmuseoamano.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/dsc_0281.jpg

 

ADDENDUM:

“Saturated” Dye Decorated Cloths from North and West Africa”.

“Drawn primarily from the DMA’s collection, this exhibition presents eleven dye-decorated cloths produced by traditional techniques and worn as garments or accessories. Before the introduction of European manufactured printed textiles to Africa in the 19th century, textile designs were made with natural dyes on plain homespun cotton, wool, raffia, or other materials. Women were most often the dyers, and dye-decorated cloth was a major form of feminine artistic expression” – DMA

” In Côte d’Ivoire, women’s political activism has exploited this strong rhetorical form. In 1949, outside the jail in Grand Bassam, women stripped, sang, and ludely danced. In 2002, at the urging of “young patriots” to resist the attack that ignited the civil war, Nanan Kolia Tano, female chief of the Baoulé village of Douakandro, organized five elderly women to execute Adjanou, a “mystical” dance performed in the nude, to ward off the cataclysm. They danced for seven days until rebel soldiers abducted and killed them. Only the chief escaped [4]. In 2003, when the French intervened to broker a coalition government, naked women blocked Dominique de Villepin from exiting the Ivoirian presidential palace and urinated on his car’s wheels [5]. In February 2011 several dozen Adjanou dancers appeared in Treichville to protest “their children’s arbitrary abductions” [6] by Gbagbo’s Republican Guard (Figure 2). They brandished their kodjos (loincloths) to “thrash the enemy.” That month in Yamoussoukro hundreds of kaolin-smeared women occupied the late President Houphouët-Boigny’s residence to perform Adjanou continuously to condemn the deplorable state of the country’s affairs.” According to the organizer, theirs was a “spiritual combat,” conducted in a domain in which “the strength and the power belong to Woman” [7]. ” – Grillo, Laura S“Female Genital Power in Ritual and Politics: Violation and Deployment in Southern Côte d’Ivoire .” Fieldsights – Hot Spots, Cultural Anthropology Online, May 14, 2012, http://www.culanth.org/fieldsights/196-female-genital-power-in-ritual-and-politics-violation-and-deployment-in-southern-cote-d-ivoire

” To go naked or with only a breech cloth was one symptom of madness among the Baule and even casual observers noted the extreme modesty  of men as well as women” …Mona Etienne continues to elucidate the pre-contact use of cloth as both a medium that calibrated gender relations between men and women within Baule culture and cloth as an exchange commodity, used to acquire salt, guns, gunpowder, and captives [Etienne’s term]. After colonization, “women no longer control cloth but are controlled by it.”  from “Women and Men, Cloth and Colonization : The Transformation of Production-Distribution Relations among the Baule”  (Ivory Coast) (1977).

Considering the Grillo excerpt beside the Etienne excerpt, let’s begin to think about the way that the presence and absence of cloth in social space is transformed into political tool.

 

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 5

For those who are experiencing this as a physical class grounded in location and time (M, W 3-6) in the Fall of 2014, this class will consist of a series of studio visits in our city. Details will be shared in the prior class.

 

For those who are piecing together a correspondence class for oneself, perhaps you will take a breather. Perhaps you will organize a series of studio visits with artists willing to speak about space, property, production, economy, and self; about Virginia Woolf, imminent domain, manufactured art objects, subterranean art markets, and self as flesh cog. Good Luck!

See Les Levine’s the Museum of Mott Art, Inc

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 6

Cliff Notes: Late Capitalist production space (example: bedroom as studio); property as sculptural material; body instead of hammer (cheaper tools)

MEDITATION

You performed the studio visit. A body came with your body to a space and exchange occurred. I am making it basic, basic on purpose. The “studio” was a site that you designated as separate from daily upkeep (sleeping, eating, defecating, cleansing, working for money). Some of you might add that “studio” is separate from praying fucking, medicating, and exercising. What is gained by these separations and what is lost?

When you arrive make a written list of what is gained and what is lost.

IN CLASS (meet in classroom; attend to above meditation; decamp for bedroom/studio)

Head to your bedroom. Make an inventory of everything you own. From items there construct a carrying structure that will allow you to carry as many of your own objects with you at once. Your possessions are a sculpture entitled Beast of Burden. Take an hour to build it. Carry it with your body to the classroom. Install. Tack Inventory list to wall. Assess work by cost of items. By scale of items. Determine grade by cost and weight. Is that fair?  Why re you still invested in measurement? Decide whether you will auction off thee things at this moment. Decide what you will trade with other students in the room. Decide what remains yours. Pack up.

REFERENCES: The Dung Beetle,  Mary Mattingly, Martha Rosler’s ORIGINAL Yard Sale, Dawn Kaspar,  Gordon Matta-Clark’s Property.

HOMEWORK (for roughly TWO WEEKS)

Head  to the Isa Genzken show at the DMA. Pay attention to how mass-produced consumer objects are fused and integrated into sculptural pieces. Make five  fast sketches of the assemblages that fuse mass-produced objects while there. Return to room. As you arrange your space what objects can still function but still be sutured into new relations?

Place all of your possessions into your room. Every four days  rearrange to optimize one of these characteristics (this transformation shall occur 3 times):

1. sleep. cessation. night

2. labor. capital. construction. aggression.

3. rapture. swoon. hold. gasp.

4. consumption. swallow. fill.

5. spirit. prayer. ghost. haunting

Please document each iteration. Choose one way:

A. Document each iteration with a two minute video. Be sure that each video is shot precisely the same way (lighting, angle, cuts).

B. Document each iteration with the materials that  best encapsulate the concept organizing the assemblage.

 

 

 

 

 

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 4

Meet us in the  2nd floor hallway.

Exercise 1-7:

Choose one of your possible studio sites. Remake the site on campus:

in miniature

as fracked

as crime scene

as bower nest

as stolen territory

with a material that disappears

After one hour, together we will travel to each site as it has been reproduced on campus.

Exercise 8: Squatting as Critique

Take a photograph or a sound file produced at another’s studio/site. Draw/ mark the residue of yourself occupying/inhabiting the site directly onto the photo. What mark mark’s you as guest, as stranger, as intruder, as squatter, as lover, as ghost? Which mark provides what instruction to the artist? How should they re-enter their selected site after you have marked it? How can they make again? Whose site is it anyway?

Homework: Choose one of the five sites you formerly selected to function as your studio. (Return there. Wait. What is the site asking of you? How should you return?)

Bring another there. Invite them for a studio visit.  What does that mean? Dialogue. A Kiss.  Commerce. You hold the visitor’s hair back while the visitor vomits. Bottled water, next time. The visitor asks if this work is on archival quality paper? No, because we live in the 6th Extinction. Nothing is going to last.

Notes: Miniature Room Room Tone  (Lori Tally); Nutshell Studies (Frances Glessner Lee); Susan Stewart (On Longing); Comancheria, Ten Bears, and property as abstraction, Mike Wolf’s miniature police line barrier; Midwestern Radical Cultural Corridor

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 3

Meet in classroom.

Cliff Notes: Fantasies of Control (presentation and space); Appropriation of “Public” Space; Observation as Criticism; Criticism as Treat and Knife; City as Space as Studio

Exercise One (one hour):

Bring materials to build pedestal without the use of the wood shop. Build pedestal. Install pedestal with sound recording and object in atrium.

Exercise Two:

Observation as Criticism (90 minutes):

1. Make record of which pedestals are approached and which are not.

2. Make record of how much time is spent with the recordings and how the bodies that do not stop hold themselves.

3. Listen to a recording without observing the object. Observe your listening. How does your listening alter the object?

4. Observe the object without listening to the recording. How does your observation alter the recording? Or not?

5. Observe the object while listening to the recording.What did you not notice this time?

6. Use the remaining time to draw the pedestal without the object. The drawing is a critique.

7. Your notes and your drawing are both gift and a violence to the person who made this work. When is observation violent?

DISCUSSION: CITY AS STUDIO. (DALLAS)  (X) IS A PLACE

leelozanograve

Image (above): Lee Lozano’s grave site in Grand Prairie

Watch:   Erykah Badu’s “Window Seat” (2010)  and  Ant Farm’s “The Eternal Frame” (1975)

Examine the documentation of  Chapman Kelley’s DFW work and begin to think about the notes for Robert Smithson’s DFW piece

See Lee Lozano’s text for Dropout Piece (1972-)  and read “Coming to Terms” from The Dallas Iconoclasts in Off Our Backs

Investigate Rick Lowe’s “Vickery Meadows” (2013) amongst a series of Nasher site-specific commissions

HOMEWORK

Search for an outdoor site within the city limits but outside of campus that will become/is now/ your studio/territory/lab.

Document five  different options. Take ten minute field recordings for each site. Make three photographs at each site: ground and sky and your body. Record date and time at each site. Print photographs.

NOTES:

Chapman Kelley:    “In March of 1976 at my Saturday art critique I challenged attendees with the proposition, “What would you do if you were able to do anything in the world?”  After each student had been called on they turned the question back to me. By this time I was used to the conscious use of intuition that I had learned from author, inventor and futurist R. Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller at the University of Illinoissymposium called “Matrix for the Arts,” in 1967 where I was a participant.  The result of this learning had already brought me opportunities such as creating the Dallas-based art school the Northwood Institute, the Free University at Lee Park and the training of high school students in the arts as part of Mayor John Erik Jonsson’s “Goals for Dallas” initiative.  Once in a while I’d have the opportunity to share the following experience with others in my studio. I’d tell them how I had been travelling with my clients in their private planes.  I suddenly realized that I could transpose both figuratively and metaphorically the flat concrete roads and runways of the new Dallas/Ft. Worth Airport with the nonfigurative elements of my paintings. The airport’s general oval drainage areas among the runways were bordered with black top asphalt which mirrored the bands around the ellipses in my work; the only thing remaining was to install actual wildflowers in place of painted ones.  Because of my close association with Françoise Gilot, Dr. Jonas Salk and Fuller’s tutelage I realized the environmental benefits of cultivating wildflowers to an exacting new level, coupled with gaining the public’s approval of a new aesthetic and replace the still-current preference for residential and commercial water-guzzling green lawns, that we should no longer tolerate because of the worldwide water crisis.”…see: http://www.dallasarthistory.com/2012/07/chapman-kelleys-memoirs-chapter-11.html

 

A Dallas take on Lee Lozano:http://www.dallasobserver.com/1999-12-09/news/the-dropout-piece/

Smithson: http://www.robertsmithson.com/drawings/wandering_earth_mounds_800.htm and  http://www.fluentcollab.org/mbg/index.php/interview/index/181/116…

Catherine Caesar: Long Read: The Cultural Politics of Air Travel: Art at Dallas Fort Worth Airport, Then and Now

 

 

 

 

 

Anhoek School: Revolutionary Year 222: Course: Class 2

We shall meet outdoors.

Cliff Notes: Land as exhibition space. Replication as form of Critique. Campus as studio.

Exercise 1: When you arrive, place your drawing on the lawn or gravel. Keep moving drawings as they arrive, attempting different configurations, until all members of the class have arrived or it has been ten minutes after the hour.

Exercise 2: Critique as Replication: Redraw the work. After you have redrawn it, discuss with initial maker:

1. accuracy of replication. 2.  copyright 3. property 4. territory 5. ownership 6. repetition 7. androids 8. simulacra 10. drones 11. factory 12. stepford wives 13. waves 14. twins

Exercise 3: Make one or 14 field recordings on campus that contain or attend to replication, property, androids, factory, waves…and so on. Return to class after one hour with a 14 to 20 minute recording.

Exercise 4: Replication as Critique: Re-record another’s recording using only a singular human body and the sounds it can make to comment on the sounds received. Your opinion should be embedded in the execution of the sounds made.

 

Homework:

complexshit

Image (above): Paul McCarthy’s “Complex Shit”

Listen to The New England Phonographers Union http://youtu.be/RyGAikK45PE

See Piero Manzoni’s “Artist’s Shit” http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/manzoni-artists-shit-t07667 [http://books.google.com/books?id=XcAGVtDLBpMC&pg=PA208#v=onepage&q&f=false]

Read Nance Klehm’s “Humble Pile”:  http://spontaneousvegetation.net/humble-pile/

Look at Mierle Ukeles Laderman’s “The Social Mirror” (1983) (search internet. Multiple images on various sites)

MAKING: 1. Select a human resource (electricity, gas, internet, blood, oil…anything other than human waste…)

2. Visit the site of its production (factory, tower, rig, blood bank/plasma center…) Make a field recording.

3. Bottle it. Label bottle/can/jar/dufflebag/…

4. Bring bottle and sound recording to class.

 

 

In Class Exercises: Class 1: Endangered Sound (Revolutionary Year 222/Anhoek School Correspondence Course)

Image

 

ENDANGERED SOUND: Class 1

Cliff Notes– Space: sonic. Sonic: extinction. Extinction: expression. Expression: measurement Measurement: drawing

Exercise 1: Fugue

At the threshold of the room: The first student to arrive is directed:

1. Don headphones.

2. Enter dimly lit room.

3. Listen to a sound sample: the Ōʻōʻāʻā. 

4. Imitate the call of the Ōʻōʻāʻā  until the next student arrives.

5. Place headphones on the arriving student’s ears and retreat to an unoccupied portion of the room and listen in silence.

6. Repeat until all students have arrived.

 

Exercise 2: Sound as Studio

1. Find the quietest place within one mile that is not your room.

2. Duct tape recording device to body.

3. Make a one hour recording at this site. Do not speak.

4. Leave your new studio.

5. Return to classroom.

6. Collective work: All recordings are played simultaneously.

 

Exercise 3: Grading/ Measurement/ evaluation

1. Invent a noble, ethical and liberating form of evaluation for cultural production.

2. Account for an institution that demands a spectrum of grades within a singular classroom.

3. Account for subjectivity, art history, hours labored, and notions of use-value.

4. Reject subjectivity, art history, hours labored, and notions of use-value.

5. What remains of your design?

 

Homework:

1. Listen to Toshiya Tsunodhttp://issueprojectroom.org/event/toshiya-tsunoda

2. Make a 15 minute field recording of your own in a external space (outside).

3. Make a non-representational drawing of your recording or swap with a classmate.

4. Draw for the entire length of the recording with/on materials found at the same site as your recording.

 

 

 

 

Notes: The Kaua’i ‘Ō‘ō was very vocal, making hollow, haunting, flute-like calls. Both the male and female birds were known to sing (Munro 1960). This species is known from the Hawaiian island of Kaua’i, USA, but it is now Extinct having been last recorded in 1987. Habitat destruction and invasive species were the major causes. (http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/22704323/0).  It was common in the 1890s, but declined drastically during the early 20th century (Pratt et al. 1987). By the 1970s, it was confined to the Alaka’i Wilderness Preserve (Pratt 1994). In 1981, a single pair remained, the female of which was not found after Hurricane Iwa in 1982, the male being last seen in 1985. The last report, of vocalisations only, was in 1987, and the species has not been recorded during subsequent surveys of Alaka’i (Conant et al. 1998). The last recording is purportedly a male bird vocalizing a mating call that cannot be returned.

Ōʻōʻāʻā Footage: http://www.arkive.org/kauai-oo/moho-braccatus/video-00.html

 

fugue

Syllabification: fugue

Pronunciation: /fyo͞og

/

NOUN

  • 1Music A contrapuntal composition in which a short melody or phrase (the subject) is introduced by one part and successively taken up by others and developed by interweaving the parts.

  • 2Psychiatry A state or period of loss of awareness of one’s identity, often coupled with flight from one’s usual environment, associated with certain forms of hysteria and epilepsy.

——————————————————————————-

 

 

Anhoek School: Correspondence Course: Revolutionary Year 222: A Series of Exercises Regarding Space

SONY DSCThe director of Anhoek School will be teaching a required first year undergraduate Foundations course entitled “Spaces”  this Fall at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas. The materials for this course will be crafted in a manner that invites others, under the auspices of the Anhoek School to participate/organize their own sections in locations extraneous to the university. This invitation runs counter to the contemporary iteration of the university as corporation and the academic course as university property; it eschews  measures that confine access to experimental pedagogy to elite demographics. It will not utilize Blackboard, an academic software that privatizes course resources.

The Anhoek School Correspondence Course, will exchange the bureaucratic title “Spaces” for  Revolutionary Year 222 (in keeping with the French Republican Calendar). Space is time and it is filled with bodies.

 

Image: Purple Atmosphere #4, Santa Barbara, CA, 1969, fireworks, © Judy Chicago, photo courtesy of Through the Flower archives

ditch. dawn. therapy for the end.

Gowanus Canal

1980’s NYC Tax Records: Gowanus Canal

 

A performance of Mary Walling Blackburn’s “2 of 24 Psychoanalytic Acts: Therapy for the End” will take place this Sunday, May 18 at 5 a.m. at the Gowanus boat launch, located at the river end of 2nd St. (past its intersection with Bond St.), Brooklyn.

In 2 of 24 Psychoanalytic Acts, Sarah Workneh and Abraham Adams perform the roles of psychotherapist and patient, as they listen over headphones to a prerecorded psychotherapy session addressing the fear of ecological collapse and repeat the words as they hear them.

A companion broadside, published by Ugly Duckling Presse, will be distributed.

The performance is approximately one hour, starting promptly at 5:00 a.m. The sun rises at 5:44.

Seating is limited, so please RSVP if you intend to join.

Mary Walling Blackburn is an artist, writer, and the founder of the Anhoek School. Sarah Workneh directs the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Abraham Adams is an editor at Ugly Duckling Presse.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.